2018, August 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to Harvest Garlic

garlic

 

If you grow garlic, then by now the leaves have probably turned brown and you are wondering if it is time to dig them up.  At this point, the leaves aren’t providing any food for the bulbs, so growth has stopped and the answer is “yes”. Gently dig up the bulbs and set them somewhere that isn’t in full sun, where the air  can circulate around them, and leave them there for two to three weeks, being careful to make sure that they don’t get wet (i.e. bring them in if there is a threat of rain, or better still, find a good spot inside.).

Once they are dry, rub off the soil and either braid the stems and hang them somewhere out of direct sunlight or cut off the stems and put them in a well ventilated area until fall, when they can be broken up and the individual cloves planted for next year. And, since you won’t need all of them next year, you are free to use them in cooking! There are some delicious recipes that use garlic online – click here for some yummy ones from Eating Well.

If you don’t grow garlic, but would like to give it a try, small bulbs, called setts, are available from a number of sources. I have had a lot of luck with Territorial Seed Company, although there are lots of sources out there.

Happy harvesting!

2018, August 2018, What to do in the garden

Staying ahead of Japanese beetles

japanese beetle

Japanese beetles can be a challenge at this time of year, eating every rose in sight and making an unsightly mess. Staying ahead of them – or even just keeping up with them -can be a lot of work.

There are gadgets out there that some swear by, like the pheromone-emitting bags that lure the beetles into their trap and kill them. I have no direct experience with these, but have always wondered if attracting Japanese beetles into your own yard is a good idea. Assuming the traps aren’t 100% effective, isn’t there a chance that you could end up with more beetles than you would have had without the trap? (Or is the trick to convince your neighbors to get it…) Anyway, if it works for you, great. No need to argue with success!

jap beetles

Other methods of getting rid of them are a little less palatable to the squeamish, but do work if you have the time and the patience. These consist of squishing them by hand (yeah, I know…) or knocking them off the leaves into a container of dish soap and water, where they drown.

There are additional things that you can do to help. Keep your plants healthy so that they are able to withstand an attack better. You can also try planting plants that they don’t tend to like in amongst your roses, such as Nepeta, and Chives, Garlic. And as a last result, contact someone with a pesticide license to come and deal with the grubs.

An integrated approach is probably best, as it is with most things. Good luck!

 

beetle grubs
Japanese beetle grubs

 

 

August 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Blanket Flower

IMG_1025

Gallardia, or Blanket Flower, is a wonderful addition to the late summer garden. Named after 18th century patron of botany Gaillard de Charentonneau, its common name comes either from the wild version’s tendency to blanket the ground, its bright colors which are reminiscent of the colors used in Native American Blankets. Either way, it’s a great plant to have around.

Gaillardia grows easily from seed and even though it’s a perennial, will flower the first year. They grow 8-24 inches, like full sun, and are drought resistant. Give them a try! Below are some sources for seeds.

Harris Seeds

Park Seed

American Meadows

Burpee

gallardia