2018, October 2018, What to do in the garden

Hydrangea Health

Hydrangea

Hydrangeas are lovely plants. There is one for every situation – for shade, for sun, tall, short, giant flowers (mopheads) or more sedate lacy ones (lacecaps). There are some that grow to the size of small trees, some whose blossoms can change color based on the pH of the soil, and others that stay the same. They evoke an old fashioned feel, both in the ground and as cut flowers, either fresh or dried. No wonder people love them.

As much as people love them, though, they are also confused by them. Different types of Hydrangeas require different pruning times, and when you prune has a huge impact on whether or not you get blossoms the next year. And their stems often look quite dead in winter, when, in fact, they aren’t.

Luckily, there is help out there. I am attaching a wonderful brochure put out by Proven Winners which will guide you through the confusion. Below that will be a link so that you can download it for yourself, if you like. I am also attaching a link to a great Hydrangea pruning video put out by Fine Gardening. Between the two I think you will find that Hydrangeas are a lot less daunting, and you will be free to enjoy the incredible number of opportunities that are out there. Have fun!

Hydrangeas 1Hydrangeas 2

Click Here to download this as a pdf.

Click Here to access a great video on how to prune Hydrangeas. And for a good companion article, click here.

hydrangeas

2 thoughts on “Hydrangea Health”

  1. I grew up with hydrangeas that were either pink or white. The soil was just alkaline enough to keep the colored ones pink. If we fertilized them to make them blue, they went right back to pink as soon as they could. Now that I am working just a few miles away in the Santa Cruz Mountains, we put more effort into getting some hydrangeas to stay pink. The slight acidity of the redwood forests makes them blue. Hydrangeas used to be a traditional flower in those tiny front gardens in San Francisco. Some of the got so big that they did not leave much space for anything else. They were commonly planted at foundations and against front steps, and allowed to grow outward in big semi spherical mounds. They were rad!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s