2018, October 2018, What to do in the garden

Hydrangea Health

Hydrangea

Hydrangeas are lovely plants. There is one for every situation – for shade, for sun, tall, short, giant flowers (mopheads) or more sedate lacy ones (lacecaps). There are some that grow to the size of small trees, some whose blossoms can change color based on the pH of the soil, and others that stay the same. They evoke an old fashioned feel, both in the ground and as cut flowers, either fresh or dried. No wonder people love them.

As much as people love them, though, they are also confused by them. Different types of Hydrangeas require different pruning times, and when you prune has a huge impact on whether or not you get blossoms the next year. And their stems often look quite dead in winter, when, in fact, they aren’t.

Luckily, there is help out there. I am attaching a wonderful brochure put out by Proven Winners which will guide you through the confusion. Below that will be a link so that you can download it for yourself, if you like. I am also attaching a link to a great Hydrangea pruning video put out by Fine Gardening. Between the two I think you will find that Hydrangeas are a lot less daunting, and you will be free to enjoy the incredible number of opportunities that are out there. Have fun!

Hydrangeas 1Hydrangeas 2

Click Here to download this as a pdf.

Click Here to access a great video on how to prune Hydrangeas. And for a good companion article, click here.

hydrangeas

2018, October 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to plant bulbs!

mixed spring bulbs

It’s time! Over the next two to three weeks, depending on your climate (I’m assuming Zones 4-6 for the purposes of this post) it is time to plant the bulbs that you have chosen for your garden. For the bigger ones, like Tulips or Daffodils, it makes sense to dig a hole for each one. If you have been really ambitious and have a lot of bulbs to plant, you can buy an auger bit that attaches to your drill and will make the “digging” a pleasure as long as your soil isn’t too rocky. (Just be sure you get one that is a little bit wider than your bulbs.) If you are planting a lot of little ones on one place, then its easier to dig an entire area to the depth needed, place the bulbs, and then carefully fill it in with soil. Digging hundreds of tiny holes will make you crazy. Space the holes at the proper distance apart for that type of bulb (usually stated on the packet). For a more natural look, space them in clumps, and don’t make the spacing as even.

The next question is, “How Deep?” This depends on what kind of bulb that you are talking about, but the general rule of thumb is to plant it 2-3 times deeper than the bulb is tall. So a good sized tulip bulb would be buried about 8 inches deep, whereas a small crocus bulb would be more like 4 inches.

Bulbs 2

Once you have the hole ready, you may wonder which way is up, especially if there aren’t any root remnants visible. In general, the flat end goes down and the pointy end up, but if you get one that you really aren’t sure about, plant it on its side and let the plant figure it out for itself. Plants are smart that way. (A side note: as a young gardener, I decided that I wanted to plant a row of Peonies. I ordered them through the mail, for some reason, and when they arrived, they were bare root – no soil. All there was to see was what looked like two bunches of worms attached by some fibrous stuff, some red and some white. I had absolutely no clue what to do with them, and after thinking about it for awhile, I planted them with the red “worms” down. I had a 50/50 chance, but had chosen wrongly and so had planted every single one upside down. I am pleased to say, however, that they righted themselves, and now, more than 20 years later, they still bloom every year. So, you see, plants can be very forgiving.)

Bulbs 1

Once you have set them in their hole, carefully fill it in, and make sure that they are watered a little over the next few weeks. After that, you can forget about them until they show up in the spring and you pat yourself on the back for a job well done. Have fun!

DSCN3973DSCN3997

2018, October 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to transplant?

IMG_1133

For similar reasons to why it is a good time to plant plants in the fall, it can also be a good time to transplant them. (See the post from Sept 27th for why.) With transplanting, however, the plants aren’t neatly in pots, dying to be planted,  they are already growing in your garden, so you have to give a little more thought as to whether it’s a good idea to disturb them or not.

A decent rule of thumb is to transplant/divide spring blooming plants in the fall, and fall blooming plants in the spring. When a plant is blooming, it has just expended a lot of its energy to make those flowers, and will expend even more in the near future to set seed, so it doesn’t have a lot of spare energy to rebuild itself in a new place. So if you really wish that your Asters were in a different place, make note of it, and do both of you a favor and move them in the spring. But if your Lady’s Mantle has outgrown its space, by all means, cut it up and move it around.

Dividing perennials is an involved subject in itself. Tools needed can range from a simple trowel to an axe or a saw (I’m not kidding!) And it’s always preferable to do a quick Google search on the particular plant that you are about to divide, in case it has any peculiarities. (Baptisia, and other plants with tap roots, for example, do not like being transplanted or divided much at all, so it’s best to know that going in.) But in general, when you divide something, you need to make sure that you have a decent amount of both root and shoot (stems) on each piece that you plan on putting back in the soil. That ensures that there are enough food gathering parts (the leaves) and water gathering parts (the roots) to help get the plant established.

 

DSCN4134
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) is an ephemeral, which means that it blooms in the spring but then goes completely dormant in the summer, dying down below the ground. This needs to be divided after flowering, or you’ll never find it again. I recommend putting in some sort of marker once you have transplanted it so you don’t dig it up again by mistake.
IMG_1134
Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis) is the plant with the chartreuse flowers in this picture. This plant flowers in June and can be divided easily in the fall. The Geraniums in the picture (the magenta and purplish-blue ones) can also be divided in fall.
DSCN5418
This is one of the tall Sedums – ‘Neon’, maybe? Sedums flower in the fall so would be something to transplant and divide in the Spring. They take to division really well, although I’d recommend a nice sharp horticultural knife or spade to help you along, unless you have very strong hands!
anemone
Japanese Anemones don’t really like being divided much, and don’t really need it more than once every 10 years or so. When you do, do it in the early spring, when the first leaves start to emerge, so that the plant can have a good long time to recover.

 

As with any new introduction to the ground, an important thing is to water, water, water! As plants go into winter, they need a good store of moisture in their cells to help them survive. Transplanting and dividing on a rainy day is a great start.

So if you’re in a “tidying up” frame of mind, and want to move some things around, the next week or so is a great time to do it for certain plants. (It’s no coincidence that I send these blog entries out just before the weekend… 🙂  )

2018, Design ideas, October 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Montauk Daisy

IMG_1030

The Montauk Daisy is a plant with the rather regal mouthful of a botanical name, Nipponanthemum nipponicum. As botanical the name suggests, it is native to Japan, but it has done so well in places like Long Island, NY, that its common name is a lot more close to home.

The first time I saw a Montauk Daisy, I couldn’t figure out what I was looking at. First of all, it was October, when most of the plants like Shasta Daisies are about finished flowering. Secondly, the plant was huge, almost 4 feet tall and wide, and the flowers were bigger than your typical Shasta. On closer inspection, I could see that the leaves were  leathery and glossy, nothing like any other daisy that I knew. What was this thing?

Eventually someone told me what it was, and I was able to learn more about it. Although it looks like a daisy, it actually isn’t, and is in a genus (Nipponanthemum) all to itself. It doesn’t really act like a daisy, either, since it is more shrub-like than anything else, given its size and shape. If you have the room, though, it’s well worth having in the garden, as it is deer and rabbit resistant as well as being drought and salt tolerant. So if you live on the water or like a beach-themed garden and, like many of us, have deer around, this plant is for you. Provide it with well drained soil, and full sun, and prune it in summer (see blog post from July 12 on how to best do this) and you will get a really pleasant surprise come fall!

2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

A good time to plant

DSCN1849

I get asked a lot if fall is too late to plant trees, shrubs, and perennials, and the answer is a resounding “No”. In the fall, they are starting to get ready to retire for the winter, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have the strength to establish themselves- quite the contrary. In the fall, perennials, trees, and shrubs don’t have to spend their energy on making leaves and flowers and attracting pollinators, so what energy they have can be used for root growth and getting settled in their new place.

Some caveats apply – if the summer has been very dry, and the plants seem stressed in their pots because they haven’t gotten enough water, you might want to pass them by and find others that have been better cared for. You don’t want to start with a stressed plant.

Also, if it’s a dry fall, and there is water rationing, it’s better to wait until spring when hopefully more water will be available. Just like any other time that you are planting, the new plants need to be well watered for several weeks in order to do well.

In New England, it’s best to stop by Halloween. But until then, as long as there is enough water, you can have great success with new plants. And sometimes they are on sale, because nurseries are often looking to get rid of stock so they don’t have to overwinter it. Win-win!

IMG_0212DSCN5418Microbiota 2

2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to order bulbs!

bulbs

It’s hard to believe that it’s that time already, but it is, in fact,  time to think about ordering bulbs so that they can be delivered at the best planting time. At this time of the season, when the garden is still pretty full, it’s hard to think about where to put them, or why you would even want them, really. But try to remember that feeling that you had in March, of wanting spring to come, and how nice it is to see the first snowdrop, or have daffodils outside your front door, or to see a drift of Grape Hyacinths at the edge of your walkway or patio, and consider adding to the display. It’s a gift to your future self.

crocus

As for where to plant them, that’s a little trickier, when the garden is full. So here are a few tips:

-Plant some near the front door, or the garage if that’s your main entrance, or where they can be seen from a window that you look out often. It’s often too cold or rainy or muddy in the spring to explore the out-of-the-way parts of the garden, so they will be wasted if you put them there. Put them where you can enjoy them.

-Don’t plant bulbs where you usually have piles of snow from the plow or underneath the roof where snow is likely to pile up. Those places will melt last and the bulbs may never get a chance to do their thing. (I know this from experience!) Likewise, don’t plant them in a shady, north facing place – same problem.

-Think about planting them next to your fall blooming plants. That way, the spring bulbs will have come and gone before the fall plants start to get going, and they won’t compete for space.

DSCN0781

In a month or so I’ll write about how to plant your bulbs, but in the mean time, check out your local garden center and see what they have to offer, or try some of the mail order sources below. One word of advice – when it comes to bulbs, bigger is better, and it’s worth spending a little extra money for a bigger bulb of the type that you are looking at. Those have greater food reserves and will produce a more robust plant.

Have fun!

White Flower Farm

Burpee

DSCN3978

2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

Last time to fertilize roses

IMG_2401

As I wrote about in April (See blog post from April 12), roses really appreciate a monthly dose of fertilizer from April through September. Well, here we are, in September, and it’s time to give them their final feeding before allowing them to start getting ready for the winter. This means letting any new growth that was encouraged by this latest meal to grow and harden off before the cold weather comes. if you fertilize too late, then the new foliage will get killed by frost and you will have wasted all that effort.

I will re-attach the drawing of where to fertilize, so that you don’t have to look back for it. Hopefully it will have become old hat if you have been feeding your roses monthly, but if not, it’s not too late and they will appreciate their last supper for awhile. I hope that you have had an excellent rose season!

rose drip line