February 2018, Garden ramblings

Nature’s thermometer

IMG_9045

Do you have Rhododendrons at home? If so, you have a remarkably reliable thermometer right there in your back yard that you may not have ever noticed. The ubiquitous Rhody is not just a pretty face- in the winter, its leaves can tell you a lot about the temperature outside.

At the first sign of freezing temperatures, the leaves will start to droop. On an ordinary, above-freezing day, the leaves will be almost horizontal to the ground, but as temperatures drop below freezing, they will start to point downwards,  resembling shuttlecocks. As temperatures continue to fall, they will start to curl, until they are eventually rolled up tight, just as we all would like to be on a bitterly cold day.

The horticultural reason for this “thermotropic” movement is that when broad-leaved evergreens, like the Rhodendron, are exposed to cold, they protect themselves by rolling up. In this way, the underside of the leaf, where most moisture loss occurs, is out of the drying wind. Imagine that you are outside on a cold windy day – what do you do? You wrap your arms around yourself and huddle up to keep sensitive parts from being exposed to the cold. It’s not exactly the same thing as the Rhody, but the goal of self preservation is the same.

Regardless of the reason, looking at the leaves of a Rhododendron an excellent tool for us to gauge the temperature before we go out (or don’t.) So delete your thermometer app and plant a Rhododendron! Not only will it tell you when to bundle up, but it will bring you flowers in the spring. Is there an app that can say the same? (Don’t answer that.)

 

Rhody
A Rhododendron in the spring. See how the leaves are up and open to the sun?

 

 

IMG_9047
This picture was taken when the temperature was 2 degrees F. The leaves have dropped and curled up on themselves. 

 

February 2018, Garden ramblings

Witch Hazel

 

Witch hazel leaves
I hesitate to even post this picture because the fall foliage can be so much more spectacular. I’ll post a better one if I can find one.

 

 

Are you looking for a small tree/large shrub that has pretty fall foliage, interesting, scented flowers, and blooms in winter? Or one that blooms in fall, after most flowering shrubs have finished? Or maybe an interesting native plant? Well, look no further than the Witch Hazel, Hamamelis. Within this group of plants (called a Genus)  all those things are possible.

Hamamelis intermedia ‘Arnold Promise’ has yellow, ribbon-like flowers that bloom in late February. You can force them inside as early as late January sometimes, where the warmth of a sunny windowsill will release their delicious scent. (See next week’s blog post for how to force them). If coppery-orange is more your color, try Hamamelis intermedia ‘Diane’. Both will grow to be about 12-15 feet tall (Arnold slightly larger) and approximately 10-15 feet wide, and both have spectacular fall foliage.

Hamamelis mollis, pictured in the drawing above, is similar to Hamamelis intermedia, but has more flowers and brighter fall foliage, if that’s possible.

If a fall blooming tree/shrub is what you’re after, try the native Hamelis virginiana. Growing to be 15-20 feet x 15-20 feet, this plant makes a wonderful shrub border.  Yellow flowers appear in October-November in the Northeast, with yellow fall foliage to follow.

In addition to being a great plant in the garden, Witch Hazel can also be used to make skin care products, some of which you may have seen in your local drugstore. Its attributes go on and on… If there was a downside, I’d say that it doesn’t do much in the summer. But there are plenty of other plants that will appreciate the lack of competition, so that’s barely a bad thing.

If you have the room, and want to stretch the growing season a little farther, give Witch Hazel a try!

Witch Hazel

Garden ramblings

Back Again!

Hello, and welcome (back)! My reasons for having been silent for so long include a wonderfully busy schedule, a need to grow and branch out in other areas, and sometimes just wanting to be in the garden instead of writing! Also, I haven’t gotten anything as near as exciting as a frog in the mail, lately, either. (See previous post if you think I’m hallucinating.)

The plan for this blog is to introduce you to new plants, give you some timely weekend gardening tips, and  to hopefully feed your imagination with ideas and pictures of gardens from around the world. As a landscape designer, seeing other people’s work is  a great tool – not to copy it, but as a springboard for other ideas. Yes, you can brainstorm with a picture. From time to time, I’ll also add pictures of some of the gardens that we have created.

So welcome to The Sunny Side! Weekly posts will begin starting the first week in January, but you never know what may show up before that. I’m glad to have you here.

Seasons Greetings,

Wickie Rowland

Landscape Designer/Creative Director

Labrie Associates, Design & Landscape Division, No. Hampton, NH.

phone booth copyright.png