2018, October 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to plant bulbs!

mixed spring bulbs

It’s time! Over the next two to three weeks, depending on your climate (I’m assuming Zones 4-6 for the purposes of this post) it is time to plant the bulbs that you have chosen for your garden. For the bigger ones, like Tulips or Daffodils, it makes sense to dig a hole for each one. If you have been really ambitious and have a lot of bulbs to plant, you can buy an auger bit that attaches to your drill and will make the “digging” a pleasure as long as your soil isn’t too rocky. (Just be sure you get one that is a little bit wider than your bulbs.) If you are planting a lot of little ones on one place, then its easier to dig an entire area to the depth needed, place the bulbs, and then carefully fill it in with soil. Digging hundreds of tiny holes will make you crazy. Space the holes at the proper distance apart for that type of bulb (usually stated on the packet). For a more natural look, space them in clumps, and don’t make the spacing as even.

The next question is, “How Deep?” This depends on what kind of bulb that you are talking about, but the general rule of thumb is to plant it 2-3 times deeper than the bulb is tall. So a good sized tulip bulb would be buried about 8 inches deep, whereas a small crocus bulb would be more like 4 inches.

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Once you have the hole ready, you may wonder which way is up, especially if there aren’t any root remnants visible. In general, the flat end goes down and the pointy end up, but if you get one that you really aren’t sure about, plant it on its side and let the plant figure it out for itself. Plants are smart that way. (A side note: as a young gardener, I decided that I wanted to plant a row of Peonies. I ordered them through the mail, for some reason, and when they arrived, they were bare root – no soil. All there was to see was what looked like two bunches of worms attached by some fibrous stuff, some red and some white. I had absolutely no clue what to do with them, and after thinking about it for awhile, I planted them with the red “worms” down. I had a 50/50 chance, but had chosen wrongly and so had planted every single one upside down. I am pleased to say, however, that they righted themselves, and now, more than 20 years later, they still bloom every year. So, you see, plants can be very forgiving.)

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Once you have set them in their hole, carefully fill it in, and make sure that they are watered a little over the next few weeks. After that, you can forget about them until they show up in the spring and you pat yourself on the back for a job well done. Have fun!

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2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to order bulbs!

bulbs

It’s hard to believe that it’s that time already, but it is, in fact,  time to think about ordering bulbs so that they can be delivered at the best planting time. At this time of the season, when the garden is still pretty full, it’s hard to think about where to put them, or why you would even want them, really. But try to remember that feeling that you had in March, of wanting spring to come, and how nice it is to see the first snowdrop, or have daffodils outside your front door, or to see a drift of Grape Hyacinths at the edge of your walkway or patio, and consider adding to the display. It’s a gift to your future self.

crocus

As for where to plant them, that’s a little trickier, when the garden is full. So here are a few tips:

-Plant some near the front door, or the garage if that’s your main entrance, or where they can be seen from a window that you look out often. It’s often too cold or rainy or muddy in the spring to explore the out-of-the-way parts of the garden, so they will be wasted if you put them there. Put them where you can enjoy them.

-Don’t plant bulbs where you usually have piles of snow from the plow or underneath the roof where snow is likely to pile up. Those places will melt last and the bulbs may never get a chance to do their thing. (I know this from experience!) Likewise, don’t plant them in a shady, north facing place – same problem.

-Think about planting them next to your fall blooming plants. That way, the spring bulbs will have come and gone before the fall plants start to get going, and they won’t compete for space.

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In a month or so I’ll write about how to plant your bulbs, but in the mean time, check out your local garden center and see what they have to offer, or try some of the mail order sources below. One word of advice – when it comes to bulbs, bigger is better, and it’s worth spending a little extra money for a bigger bulb of the type that you are looking at. Those have greater food reserves and will produce a more robust plant.

Have fun!

White Flower Farm

Burpee

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Design ideas, January 2018, What to do in the garden

Spring Scavenger Hunt

 

snowdrop
Snowdrops, one of the earliest spring bulbs.

 

It won’t be long before we will start to see new things popping up in the garden every day, and we will start to reap the rewards of those cold hours in the garden planting bulbs. As well as just being a lovely time to enjoy new life, this is also a great time to analyze the early spring garden, and think about what we might like to have there next year, because, let’s face it; by the time bulb planting time comes around again, we will have forgotten where everything is.

This time of year, the “homework” is simple. Look around. If the snowdrops make you happy, make yourself a note to increase their numbers, or plant some more somewhere else. If there is a place by the door that is bare, make a note of it, so that next spring you can have some color there to welcome you home. Set a reminder on your phone for Late July, when the bulb catalogues tend to come out, and sometime have sales. Then set another reminder for October, when you can buy them at your local garden center, just in time for planting. It’s a simple thing to do, and it pays off just when you want it most.

 

March 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Scilla

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This month we are featuring Scilla siberica, or Siberian Squill (Or just Scilla), a delightful little woodland wildflower, whatever you choose to call it. It will spread, but since it goes dormant in late spring and virtually disappears, this can be a blessing rather than a curse. And as long as they aren’t planted in soil that is constantly wet, they will grow with very little help from us, which can be an advantage in our busy lives.

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Personally, I find them so lovely that I can’t imagine myself being sick of them, especially since the show that they put on in the spring is just what I need after a long winter. But I’ll let you be the judge!

If you decide to grow them, buy a few bulbs in the fall and plant them in a partly sunny place in groups of 3 or 5. Or, for a more natural look, just toss them in the ground and plant them where they land.  Before long you will have a spring carpet of blue to enjoy, sometimes even in the snow.

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