April 2018, What to do in the garden

Fertilizing Roses

rose doodle

I have always had good luck with roses. Perhaps it’s because I’m half English, so it is ingrained in my particular genetic mixture. More likely though, it’s because I really like them, and because of that, I have made a point to learn what makes them happy. One thing that I do, no matter how busy I am, is to give them regular fertilizer once a month from April to September. I try to do it on the first of the month, in order to keep it consistent, and to help me remember to do it. I use Rose-tone, by Espoma, which has a nutritional breakdown of 4-3-2. (Nitrogen-Phosphorous-Potassium). I’m sure there are other good brands out there, but I like this one.

The application is simple: Just sprinkle it around the “drip line” of the plant, and either water it in, or let the rain do it. The “drip line” is the outermost circle of leaves of the plant. (See illustration.) By spreading the fertilizer that far out, as opposed to right at the base of the plant, you encourage healthy root growth and spread.

rose drip line

And that’s it! Really, the hardest part is just remembering to do it.

 

February 2018, Garden ramblings

Snow fertilizer

20110127-4568_0-photo

When I get to this point in the winter I am like a petulant child on a long road trip. “Are we THERE yet? How much LONGER?” I have been patient, and now I’m ready for things to wind down and to start to be able to think about working outside. It’s a bit soon, however, and so, like the child in the car, I must think of distractions to keep my impatience at arm’s length.

I am definitely a fan of thinking ahead and doing things now that will make life easier in the future. I always put the Christmas lights away carefully so that they won’t be a nightmare to unwrap next year, for example. Well, Mother Nature does that sort of thing, too. The snow, while nicely insulating the plants, also provides needed nitrogen for the soil.

DSCN0711

Nitrogen is essential for plant growth. It can get into the soil in a number of ways; through the decomposition of plant and animal wastes, through the planting of plants in the bean family which fix Nitrogen in their roots, and even as the result of lightning! And, of course, there is man-made fertilizer. But snow collects nitrogen from the atmosphere as it falls, and then slowly releases it into the soil, so while it may be a pain to shovel, it is actually doing its job as a pre-emergent fertilizer of sorts.

IMG_4555

While that, perhaps, isn’t enough to make the child in the back seat stop whining completely, it is at least enough to make me feel like snow has a purpose in the garden. And you have to admit, it is beautiful. So while we aren’t THERE, yet, perhaps there is still some of the journey left to be enjoyed.

DSCN0745