2018, November 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Plant-of-the-Month: The Sourwood Tree

IMG_1033 2

Sourwood, or Oxydendrum arboreum, is a sorely underused tree. Native to eastern North America, it is probably at its northernmost limit here in southern New Hampshire, as it is only hardy to Zone 5, but we are so lucky to have it here! Sourwood is a slow grower, but will top out at 30 feet if given time and space and a moist but well drained environment. It performs best in full sun, but doesn’t mind part shade.

But those are the boring details – I haven’t told you the best part yet! Sourwood flowers in late summer, and covers itself in delicate sprays of fragrant, white, lily-of-the-valley-like flowers. Those flowers are enough to recommend it, but wait! There’s more! The flowers persist into fall, when Sourwood’s leaves turn a screaming red. IT is almost wrong, it’s so red. Then, for a little while, you have both the flowers and the red leaves, until the leaves finally fall and only the seed heads remain to decorate the bare branches.

If you have the space, I urge you to give one a try. It is an eye-catching addition to any garden and a must-have if you like unusual plants!

 

photo 2 (3) 3
A mature Sourwood.

DSCN3177 4