2019, Gardens of the World, Uncategorized

Armchair Travellers’ Gardens: Eze- an exotic garden town on the French Riviera

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I am lucky enough to have seen some interesting gardens in my travels, and in 2019 am going to share one of them with you each month. So without further ado, let’s go to France!

Less than 6 miles  from Monaco, along the Middle Corniche, lies the town of Eze, one of the diamonds in the extravagantly bejeweled crown that is the French Riviera. Built on a cliff about 1400 feet above sea level around the ruins of an ancient château, Eze has a medieval section which  is comprised of tiny streets which are at most about 12 feet wide, and therefore, there are no cars. These streets rise steeply uphill and curve and split off from each other like a maze, with surprises around every corner: a café, a shop; a wall completely covered in blossoms, or a quiet, shady corner with a seat.  The slope of the streets makes for an unhurried climb, with time to notice these things and enjoy them at leisure (Unless, of course, you are a UPS man or a valet bringing luggage up to the luxury hotel at the top, both of whom I saw and felt rather sorry for!)

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Eze itself is like a well built garden, complete with patios, walls, and pergolas, and planted with trees and vines that we, here in New England, can only dream about growing. Bougainvillea and Plumbago foam from every opening, tropical vines scramble up walls, and olive trees have been trained against the walls so as not to impede the flow of foot traffic. Although it is now a town, you can see how it was once private property, and there is a distinctly home-like feeling to it. As a visitor, one feels quite at leisure to explore, discover, rest, and enjoy it all.

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For those with a sense of adventure and a head for heights, the climb up to the very top of the town to the Jardin Exotique d’Eze is a must. The view from the top, looking out over Monaco to the east, and Nice and the Côte d’Azur to the west, is stunning. The garden, created in the 1950’s by the designers of the Jardin Exotique de Monaco, is full of Cacti and Succulents from all over the world. There are collections of Agave, Aloe,Yucca, and Euphorbia, to name a few, and Cacti of every shape that you can imagine, including ones that look like they could be rather comfortable to sit on, until you get close enough to see their two inch spines.

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The Jardin d’Eze is a definite must if you are ever in that area of the world; bring your curiosity and comfortable shoes!

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2019, Plant-of-the-month, Uncategorized

Plant-of-the-Month: Winterberry Holly

 

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People are often surprised that Winterberry Holly, or Ilex verticillata, is a holly at all, because it doesn’t have the glossy, spiky leaves that you think of when you hear the name Holly. And unlike the traditional Holly (Ilex meserveae cvs), it loses its leaves in the winter, which also seems foreign to “Holly”. While this is often seen as a bad characteristic, in this case it is when Winterberry shines, as the female plants are covered from head to toe in bright red berries. A hedge of Winterberry Holly can be a real showstopper in the snow, and the berries persist a long time- or, at least, until the birds are done with them or you have picked them for holiday decorations!

‘Red Sprite’ Winterberry grows to be about 3-4’ x 3-4’ and us very compact. It is hardy to Zone 3, so will tolerate some pretty cold conditions. ‘Sparkleberry’ is similar, but is bigger, at 8-10’ x 8-10’. Both plants will produce more berries if a male is somewhere in the vicinity, so get a ‘Southern Gentleman’ or a ‘Jim Dandy’ and stick it somewhere inconspicuous, as there are no berries and the flowers are inconsequential.

Winterberries prefer full sun to part shade and can be used in wetland areas as well in places with normal amounts of moisture. They won’t do as well in very dry conditions, although I have been surprised before.

Try some! They will make you happy when the landscape begins to look a little forlorn.

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2018, December 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Plant-of-the-month: Holly

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Holly is a quintessential December plant. It is hung about the house at Christmas time, and is steeped in religious tradition. The Druids believed that Holly stayed green in the winter and had red berries so as to keep the world looking beautiful when the Oak was without leaves. (Many a landscape designer has had that same thought, too.) Holly has been thought to keep away lightning, frighten off witches, and keep goblins away from little girls. Some say it brings about sweet dreams, and others say you can use it to make a tincture to get rid of a cough, although from what I have read, ingesting holly would only relieve a cough by giving you something much worse to worry about, so best leave holly out of any cold remedy.

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The Holly pictured above has the typical holly look: shiny, prickly evergreen leaves, and lustrous red berries. You need both a male and a female holly plant in order to get berries, which appear only on the female. Some grow to be 15-20 feet tall like Ilex aquipernyi ‘Dragon Lady’ while others are considerably shorter. Some are pyramidal in shape, some are tall and very thin, while others are rounded. If prickly leaves aren’t for you, Ilex glabra, or Inkberry Holly, has rounded leaves a lot like Boxwood, and is a decent substitute if you don’t like Boxwood’s smell. If bare branches covered with berries is more your style, Ilex verticillata, or Winterberry Holly, is a deciduous version that looks fantastic in the winter. All hollies like full sun to part shade, and moist, well drained soil.

 

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Winterberry Holly

 

Plant one or two to keep away the elements, witches, bad dreams or to just keep the world looking beautiful in the winter, it’s up to you. There’s a holly for everyone. All you have to do is find the one that makes you happy.

 

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Winterberry Holly outside my phone booth/tool shed.

 

 

2018, November 2018, What to do in the garden

Take care of tender perennials

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It’s starting to get colder, and soon the snow will start to fall. This is great for the plants, as snow is an excellent insulator. But what if it doesn’t snow? What if it’s just really cold for awhile, first? Straight – up cold can be devastating for perennials, especially tender ones that are at the limit of their cold hardiness, or new ones that got planted late.

What to do? Well, it’s better to hedge your bets and give your most precious plants some protection than just hope that there will be snow. This doesn’t mean anything too complicated – just cover the crowns of the plants with salt-marsh hay, or evergreen tree boughs. (You can supplement these later with boughs cut off your Christmas tree, if you have one.)

Roses can also benefit from a little cover. Plastic fencing or chicken-wire, wrapped around them, and stuffed with leaves works well. You can also buy things made especially for roses, but then you have to figure out where to store them the rest of the year. But in the end, it’s up to you. Anything you can do to help the plants will be greatly appreciated by them, and they will reward you in kind in the summer.

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2018, November 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to do your future self a favor

The gardening season has pretty much wound down by now, and before the holiday season starts up and while the garden is still fresh in your mind, you can do your future self a favor and prepare for next spring, now, by getting organized so that when the time comes, you won’t be searching for blunt tools or wondering why your peony hoops have become inexorably tangled with the gardening twine. It’s rather like taking the time to put the Christmas lights away properly so that you won’t have a tangled nightmare next time you need them.

-While your gardening tools are all in one place (or if they aren’t in one place, get them in one place), go through them and see which ones can be sharpened and either sharpen them yourself or bring them to a professional. There are some inexpensive kits out there, and it’s not hard to do. Then rub a very light coat of oil on the blades to help prevent rust, and put them away somewhere where you will remember to find them in the spring! For more on this, click here.

-Sort through the area where you keep your gardening tools, and make sure that everything is in good shape. Get new wooden handles, if necessary, throw away anything which is beyond fixing, and clean off any soil from shovels and spades.

-Paint the wooden handles of your garden tools. I can’t tell you how many pairs of pruners I have lost, but I can tell you that the ones that I have had the longest have red or orange handles. Some came that way, but others I painted myself. I just taped off the business end of the tool and sprayed the handle scarlet. Not only are they easier to pick out when you have gotten distracted and put them down amongst the flowers, but people are far less likely to walk off with them thinking they are theirs!

-And finally, get the oil changed in any power equipment that you have that needs it. You wouldn’t want to wait until the first snowfall to get your snow blower serviced, and you wouldn’t want your string trimmer or blower to fail to start the first time you feel inspired to use it. We all know how long it takes for that inspiration to come back.

Just a few preparatory steps now and you will be patting yourself on the back in the spring. So go ahead! Set yourself up for success! You’ll be thanking yourself before you know it.

2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

A good time to plant

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I get asked a lot if fall is too late to plant trees, shrubs, and perennials, and the answer is a resounding “No”. In the fall, they are starting to get ready to retire for the winter, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have the strength to establish themselves- quite the contrary. In the fall, perennials, trees, and shrubs don’t have to spend their energy on making leaves and flowers and attracting pollinators, so what energy they have can be used for root growth and getting settled in their new place.

Some caveats apply – if the summer has been very dry, and the plants seem stressed in their pots because they haven’t gotten enough water, you might want to pass them by and find others that have been better cared for. You don’t want to start with a stressed plant.

Also, if it’s a dry fall, and there is water rationing, it’s better to wait until spring when hopefully more water will be available. Just like any other time that you are planting, the new plants need to be well watered for several weeks in order to do well.

In New England, it’s best to stop by Halloween. But until then, as long as there is enough water, you can have great success with new plants. And sometimes they are on sale, because nurseries are often looking to get rid of stock so they don’t have to overwinter it. Win-win!

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2018, September 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to order bulbs!

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It’s hard to believe that it’s that time already, but it is, in fact,  time to think about ordering bulbs so that they can be delivered at the best planting time. At this time of the season, when the garden is still pretty full, it’s hard to think about where to put them, or why you would even want them, really. But try to remember that feeling that you had in March, of wanting spring to come, and how nice it is to see the first snowdrop, or have daffodils outside your front door, or to see a drift of Grape Hyacinths at the edge of your walkway or patio, and consider adding to the display. It’s a gift to your future self.

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As for where to plant them, that’s a little trickier, when the garden is full. So here are a few tips:

-Plant some near the front door, or the garage if that’s your main entrance, or where they can be seen from a window that you look out often. It’s often too cold or rainy or muddy in the spring to explore the out-of-the-way parts of the garden, so they will be wasted if you put them there. Put them where you can enjoy them.

-Don’t plant bulbs where you usually have piles of snow from the plow or underneath the roof where snow is likely to pile up. Those places will melt last and the bulbs may never get a chance to do their thing. (I know this from experience!) Likewise, don’t plant them in a shady, north facing place – same problem.

-Think about planting them next to your fall blooming plants. That way, the spring bulbs will have come and gone before the fall plants start to get going, and they won’t compete for space.

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In a month or so I’ll write about how to plant your bulbs, but in the mean time, check out your local garden center and see what they have to offer, or try some of the mail order sources below. One word of advice – when it comes to bulbs, bigger is better, and it’s worth spending a little extra money for a bigger bulb of the type that you are looking at. Those have greater food reserves and will produce a more robust plant.

Have fun!

White Flower Farm

Burpee

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