2018, November 2018, What to do in the garden

Time to do your future self a favor

The gardening season has pretty much wound down by now, and before the holiday season starts up and while the garden is still fresh in your mind, you can do your future self a favor and prepare for next spring, now, by getting organized so that when the time comes, you won’t be searching for blunt tools or wondering why your peony hoops have become inexorably tangled with the gardening twine. It’s rather like taking the time to put the Christmas lights away properly so that you won’t have a tangled nightmare next time you need them.

-While your gardening tools are all in one place (or if they aren’t in one place, get them in one place), go through them and see which ones can be sharpened and either sharpen them yourself or bring them to a professional. There are some inexpensive kits out there, and it’s not hard to do. Then rub a very light coat of oil on the blades to help prevent rust, and put them away somewhere where you will remember to find them in the spring! For more on this, click here.

-Sort through the area where you keep your gardening tools, and make sure that everything is in good shape. Get new wooden handles, if necessary, throw away anything which is beyond fixing, and clean off any soil from shovels and spades.

-Paint the wooden handles of your garden tools. I can’t tell you how many pairs of pruners I have lost, but I can tell you that the ones that I have had the longest have red or orange handles. Some came that way, but others I painted myself. I just taped off the business end of the tool and sprayed the handle scarlet. Not only are they easier to pick out when you have gotten distracted and put them down amongst the flowers, but people are far less likely to walk off with them thinking they are theirs!

-And finally, get the oil changed in any power equipment that you have that needs it. You wouldn’t want to wait until the first snowfall to get your snow blower serviced, and you wouldn’t want your string trimmer or blower to fail to start the first time you feel inspired to use it. We all know how long it takes for that inspiration to come back.

Just a few preparatory steps now and you will be patting yourself on the back in the spring. So go ahead! Set yourself up for success! You’ll be thanking yourself before you know it.

2018, November 2018, Plant-of-the-month

Plant-of-the-Month: The Sourwood Tree

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Sourwood, or Oxydendrum arboreum, is a sorely underused tree. Native to eastern North America, it is probably at its northernmost limit here in southern New Hampshire, as it is only hardy to Zone 5, but we are so lucky to have it here! Sourwood is a slow grower, but will top out at 30 feet if given time and space and a moist but well drained environment. It performs best in full sun, but doesn’t mind part shade.

But those are the boring details – I haven’t told you the best part yet! Sourwood flowers in late summer, and covers itself in delicate sprays of fragrant, white, lily-of-the-valley-like flowers. Those flowers are enough to recommend it, but wait! There’s more! The flowers persist into fall, when Sourwood’s leaves turn a screaming red. IT is almost wrong, it’s so red. Then, for a little while, you have both the flowers and the red leaves, until the leaves finally fall and only the seed heads remain to decorate the bare branches.

If you have the space, I urge you to give one a try. It is an eye-catching addition to any garden and a must-have if you like unusual plants!

 

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A mature Sourwood.

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